Thursday, December 27, 2007

Nerve Strikes - With Your Knee

You face your attacker. It's going to be a close-range fight. Your assailant grabs you, and drops to the ground in pain. You already know this nerve strike. The beauty of this application is you execute your nerve strikes with your knee.

Nerve Strikes From Childhood Antics
When you were a kid, did you ever receive (or give) a "Charlie Horse?"

It's that sickeningly painful feeling you get when someone raps his or her knuckles on the center of one of your muscles.

When we were kids, the older boys in the neighborhood would pound us a good one on the edge of the biceps or on the middle of the thigh. Boy, did those punches hurt -- a nerve strike, right on the muscle. Ouch.

Using the Thigh Nerve Strike
Early in my martial-arts studies with Steve Golden (original Bruce Lee and Ed Parker student), the more senior students reacquainted me with the nerve strike on the thigh muscle.

Except, they executed their thigh nerve strikes with their knees.

We would be in close, fighting. I would concentrate on the hands, and make the beginner's error of forgetting about the lower lines of attack.

Suddenly, when my opponent's leg was slightly to the outside of mine, he'd angle his leg back in and dig his knee into my upper leg -- right on the Charlie Horse spot.

The knee would strike my leg, and I would instantly feel like vomiting. The pain started as a sharp pain, but would quickly spread to the rest of the thigh. I had to limp to the side of the workout area.

Improving Your Nerve Strikes
Execute your nerve strikes when your opponent's attention is focused on your face or hands. In other words:

* Take advantage of unexpected distractions

* Create your own distractions

* Knee strike as a secondary move

* Don't look down before you strike -- no sense warning your opponent

And as you strike with your knee into the nerves on the thigh, already be on your way with your follow-up technique.

What and where will you strike while your opponent is reacting to the nerve strike on the thigh? Will you follow with another nerve strike to a different part of the body?

If you like efficient martial-arts strikes and counters, then read my new, Free ebooklet:

Download this Free ebooklet: Elbow Strikes and Counters

For an article on martial arts solo training, read Training By Yourself.

Here's a site about punching harder and faster ... Free Punch ebook.

Keith Pascal is a martial-arts writer and has taught martial arts for 25 years.

How to Avoid These MMA Workout Mistakes

If your Mixed Martial Arts workout could produce any results you desire, what would those be? Would you like to have more strength? Maybe you'd like to be more flexible. Or maybe you'd like to fight until that final bell rings without getting tired?

The answers you just came up with in your head probably depend on your current strengths and weaknesses. And I'm willing to bet that right now you have some area of physical weakness that you've thought "If I only had better (fill in the blank), my performance would improve ten fold. Recognizing this is a huge step forward because these weak areas are what really hold your performance back.

For example, take the fighter who is very physically strong. Whenever you have to train with this guy, you think to yourself "I hate fighting this guy. He over powers me every time."

But then you remind yourself that while he is very strong, his strength doesn't last for very long. You know that if you can force him to exert some energy, his strength quickly drains.

In the end, it's not his incredible strength that stands out, but his lack of endurance. Endurance is his Achilles heel, and pretty soon his strength doesn't even matter anymore.

The other example that I've seen a lot, is the fighter who has incredible flexibility, but very little strength.

Flexibility is such a great thing for a mixed martial artist to have because it gives you a very distinct advantage over your opponents. But again, it's usually your weak areas that show through the most.

There are some really great fighters out there that are incredibly flexible, but they lack strength, power, and conditioning - or even all three.

Don't let your weak areas overshadow your strengths. Don't let your opponent negate your strength because your endurance is weak. Don't let your opponent overcome your superior technique because your conditioning is faulty.

Strengthen your current physical short comings and your performance will improve ten fold.

Use an Ideal MMA Workout:

Just like a mixed martial artist cross trains in fighting styles - becoming great at wrestling, Jiu Jitsu, submissions, boxing, kickboxing, etc - he also needs to "cross train" in his physical conditioning.

Your ideal mixed martial arts workout should build up all of the physical tools you need.

It shouldn't focus just on flexibility, just on strength, or just on endurance. It should improve all of those things together - as much as is possible. This way you don't end up like the guy we talked about above who has a ton strength, but gets tired too fast. This way you won't be the guy who can run a two and a half hour marathon, but doesn't have any functional strength.

In a fight, you don't use flexibility, or strength or endurance separately. They are all combined at the same time. And you will be more successful if you have a good balance of all of them. So the best mixed martial arts workouts train these elements simultaneously.

Rickson Gracie explains this concept -

"[In a] fight you must have speed. You must be flexible. You must have strength. You must have endurance. Everything at once. And the exercises I do combine all of them."

So now I would like to give you a very simple, but powerful way, to put this into action so your workouts actually simulate a fight.

Pick five exercises or drills to perform. (There are way too many options to cover them all in this article) We will just pick a few simple ones that you probably already know how to do.

We'll use a variety of bodyweight exercises: pushups, sit-ups, squats, lunges, and leg lifts. These exercises are very basic, but you can substitute different exercises in the future.

We have chosen five exercises that hit various muscle groups throughout your entire body.

Now you want to perform the exercises in a continuous, circuit style fashion for five minutes straight without stopping. To make the workout even more specific to mixed martial arts, you can add 30 second bouts of shadow boxing to the circuit. Here's a quick run down of the end result:

Minute 1:
30 seconds - pushups
30 seconds - shadow boxing

Minute 2:
30 seconds - sit-ups
30 seconds - shadow boxing

Minute 3:
30 seconds - squats
30 seconds - shadow boxing

Minute 4:
30 seconds - leg lifts
30 seconds - shadow boxing

Minute 5:
30 seconds - lunges
30 seconds - shadow boxing

Now, you have a very simple, high intensity, five-minute workout that you can use any time, anywhere.

This circuit style MMA workout conditions your body to perform the same way you would in a fight, getting no rest for an entire five minutes and using a wide variety of full body exercises.

The workout seems simple, but you'll begin experiencing positive results very quickly if you use the process as I have outlined it above. And, as your conditioning improves, you can begin implementing more advanced exercises and more MMA-specific drills to increase the intensity and take your conditioning to an even higher level!

Powerhouse author, specializing in Mixed Martial Arts workouts, conditioning and training, Marcus Fisher, has a passion for helping fighters, grapplers and other combat athletes reach their peak performance.

He runs a training website filled with resources for mixed martial artists, grapplers and fighters including workout articles, conditioning books, training manuals and DVDs. Visit his MMA Training, Workout and Conditioning site and while you're there, you can also get his free daily health and conditioning tips.

Pressure Points

Martial artists are known for making use of pressure points in a fight. Whether applying a joint lock or pressing a spot on the body with a finger, martial practitioners can inflict pain, at will.

They press a spot on the arm, maybe another behind the ear, and their opponents howl in pain.

For the purpose of this discussion and this martial-arts article only, a pressure point will be any point on the body, other than a vulnerable target, that when pressed with a finger, causes pain. (This modified definition will suit our purpose.)

We could argue that an eyeball or groin is a pressure point. After all, press your finger into someone’s eyeball and you’ll get that yelp of agony.

Still, I am more interested in the almost secret pressure points. These pressure points are great for:

* Striking with a phoenix eye fist (one raised knuckle) at a particular spot, possibly to end the fight in one move.

* Pressing a particular point, to control your opponent more after snapping on a wrist lock. Use the pressure point to move your opponent.

* Either hitting or pressing a point, to cause a reaction. Your opponent retracts his (or her) arm in pain, and BAM! Exactly what you wanted.

Finding Martial Arts Pressure Points
If pressure points are such a secret how is a martial artist to find good pressure points to use in a real fight?

Don’t martial artists closely guard their pressure point secrets?

Here are my suggestions for developing good pressure points for self defense:

* Experiment with spots that you know from past experience hurt. For example the mastoid process is the soft spot behind the ear. Press that indentation lightly to feel the pain. Also, above the inside of the elbow has a good soft spot.

* Join a martial arts class that focuses on self defense. Good classes incorporate pressure points into their curriculum.

* Find Chinese health charts that show meridians and pressure points. Hint -- the pressure points shown near where muscles, ligaments, and tendons are attached often offer some painful pressure points.

* Watch videos of real fights -- or something that has a few aspects of realism, like UFC. If you see someone cause pain by hooking a thumb under the jaw, that should give you a beginning point for experimentation.

* Read more articles on the subject and take notes. For example, here’s a useful article that will take you beyond pressure points in causing pain, Martial Arts -- Beyond Pressure Points

Now, the question is ... will you be able to make use of your pressure points in a real street fight? If you worry about gripping fear in a fight, then read my ebook:

This Free ebooklet will help you to be ready for any street fight -- any attack.

Download Free --“Street Fighting Tips #1 -- Ready for Anyone and Anything”

Keith Pascal has been a full-time martial-arts writer for eight years and a martial-arts teacher for 25 years.

What if We Eliminated The Belt System in Martial Arts

A few years ago I delivered a major customer service training program to a large company in the Midwest.

When the going got rough, as it always seems to do when you're trying to introduce sweeping change to hundreds of workers, one of my contacts at the company, in exasperation, asked:

"Why can't you just give us a prize and go away?"

It seems the same service unit I was struggling to fix had the misfortune to have been handed a "Best in Service" award by an industry survey company, the previous year.

From that point forward, many of the workers were simply ineducable. They thought they knew everything, were already wonderful, and couldn't really advance. Moreover, they didn't want to get any better at what they did for a living.

At my own expense I flew to New England to interview the president of the company that issued the award to that flawed team. Along with a few of his key associates, we had lunch and at one very relaxed moment I asked him: "What would happen if your company stopped issuing customer service awards?"

He looked at me to check my sanity and then said, barely suppressing a laugh, "Why we'd go broke."

I had him, and I knew it.

Then, I asked: "So, you're really in the PRIZE business even more than the survey research business, right?""

Knowing he was cornered, he forced a smile and conceded, "I guess we are."

I offer this elaborate tale to put a question to you, especially if you own or belong to a martial arts dojo.

Are you in the martial arts training field or in the "belt business?" And what would happen if you decided to eliminate the various belt ranks, which range in most cases from white to black?

Would you go broke as well?

I happen to believe the belt system of promotion, while exceedingly popular in the United States and in many countries, is fundamentally flawed and it, too, leads people to aim at the prize instead of the underlying capabilities that the prizes, in this case the belts, signify.

This isn't sour grapes. After eight arduous and sacrificial years, I was awarded my black belt in kenpo karate.

But many aspects of the belt-chase were counterproductive, and if I had it to do over again, I doubt I'd join a dojo that uses this system of recognition and advancement. As I pointed out in a recent article:

"Belts make the trainee impatient and greedy for the next promotion, for acquiring the next color in the martial arts rainbow. Belts spawn competition among peers to become the first to test for the next higher level, causing a certain amount of strife, accusations of favoritism or toadyism, and occasionally injuries as contestants vie for increasingly distinguished and relatively unpopulated rungs on the status ladder.

"You might find it interesting to note, in the last paragraph I alluded to, arguably six of The Seven Deadly Sins, articulated in the Bible and by various theologians through time, including Pope St. Gregory and Buddha. These are vices that the sages have said mortals are wise to avoid indulging: Pride, Greed, Envy,Wrath/Anger. Lust, Gluttony, and Sloth. It makes you wonder if the Enlightened One would feel comfortable meditating under the bodhi tree with a martial arts sash tied around his waist!"

Perhaps getting rid of the belt system would leave only those students that genuinely want to learn and teachers that want to teach. Instead of focusing inordinately on symbols of achievement, perhaps we could dedicate ourselves to the real thing.

Dr. Gary S. Goodman is a top trainer, conference and convention speaker, sales, customer service, and negotiation consultant, and attorney. A frequent expert commentator on radio and TV, he is also the best-selling author of 12 books, more than 1,000 articles and several popular audio and video programs. His seminars are sponsored internationally and he teaches at more than 40 university extension programs, including UC Berkeley and UCLA. Gary's sales, management and consulting experience is combined with impressive academic credentials: A Ph.D. from USC, an MBA from the Peter F. Drucker School of Management, and a J.D. degree from Loyola Law School, his clients include several Fortune 1000 companies.

His web site is: http://www.customersatisfaction.com and he can be reached at: gary@customersatisfaction.com - His blogs include: YOUR CUSTOMER SERVICE SUCKS! and ALWAYS COLD CALL! at: http://www.alwayscoldcall.blogspot.com

Top 10 Mixed Martial Arts Dream Matches - No Rematches

Many MMA fans have their own personal fights that they would like to see, but might never happen. Hopefully the list I'm about write with come true and these fights will take place at some point in time. Chuck Liddell vs Wanderlei Silva is on for UFC 79, so that dream match has finally come true. Obviously there are many rematches that we would like to see, but I'll save that for another post.

10. Forrest Griffin vs Quinton Rampage Jackson- Dana White is dreaming of the day this fight takes place, both hardcore and reletively new fans would pay to see this fight. Griffin is coming off an amazing victory over Mauricio Rua, a fighter that Jackson lost too badly. Rampage has been on a roll and is getting more and more popular because of his charisma and personality.

9. BJ Penn vs Sean Sherk- This fight was planned and I was really excited about it, but unfortunately Sherk tested positive for steroids and now the lightweight belt is in limbo. Penn was recently quoted as telling Sherk to "grow some balls", this fight should happen down the road.

8. Wanderlei Silva vs Mauricio Shogun Rua- Wanderlei has stated many times that he will not fight his longtime friend and training partner, but what a fight it would be. They know each others styles in and out, it would be a true chess match. One stipulation, the fight has to be in a ring and soccer kicks and stomps are allowed.

7. Fedor Emelianenko vs Josh Barnett- This fight should've already happen but it never materialized. Barnett has long been considered the biggest threat to dethrone the Russian king, Emelianenko. For fans who have followed both of the fighter's careers this would be the ultimate test for Fedor.

6. Takanori Gomi vs Gilbert Melendez- This fight would be a war and both fighters have common opponents. Both fighters like to slug it out and it could be very similar to Gomi vs Nick Diaz which is one of the best fights Ive ever seen.

5. Anderson Silva vs Paulo Filho- Both of these fighters have tremendous Jiu-Jitsu skills, obviously Silva would have the advantage standing, but whatever the strategy would be this would be a dream matchup. Filho is undefeated and Silva looks like he could beat anyone on the planet right now. Dana White if your listening "Sign Paulo Filho!!!!".

4. Wanderlei Silva vs Fedor Emelianenko- Wanderlei has fought heavyweights like Crocop twice and Mark Hunt, why not the Fedor. This fight could've happened if Pride was still around, with their open-weight grand prix tournaments. Both fighters are warriors who give it everything they have in every fight. This fight is unfortunately probably never gonna happen.

3. Dan Henderson vs Anderson Silva- If Henderson were to drop back to middleweight, the hype for this fight would be enormous. Both fighters are so well-versed in every aspect of the game. Would Hendo's wrestling be too much for Silva? Could Hendo avoid the nasty clinch of Silva? Many more questions would be answered if this superfight were to take place.

2. Fedor Emelianenko vs Randy Couture- Whether you hate Fedor or you love him, all 3 fights with him in it that are on this list, you would pay to see. This fight was close to happening, if the UFC could've signed Fedor it would've probably been his first fight. Now that Fedor has signed with M-1 global and Couture has quit the UFC, its only a matter of months left on Couture's UFC contract that we could see this fight. Could Couture press the greco roman clinch and dirty box Fedor to death or would it be just another day at the office for the Russian experiment?

1. Kazushi Sakuraba vs Rickson Gracie- The "Gracie Hunter" against the legendary champion of the Gracie family, who claims to have won over 300 fights without a loss. This fight will probably never happen, but we can dream. This fight would be so huge in Japan you would probably have to kill 3 people just to get a nose bleed seat.

Richard Pauley is the writer of the 2 MMA blogs below.
http://onepunchko.com
http://ultimatemma.blogspot.com


Tuesday, December 4, 2007

SIMPLE WAY OF FIGHTING.....PRACTICAL COACHING

Eric Florez vs Louisville MMA

Why you Should Watch Aikido Video Clips

Aikido was developed by as a martial art by Morihei Ueshiba who studied several martial arts since 1912. Known to many aikido practitioners as "O Sensei" or the "Great Teacher," Ueshiba was able to develop the martial art based on a purely physical level using techniques and movements such those of "Jujitsu" and "Kenjutsu" called "aikido."

It is believed that aikido was first introduced to the Western culture way back in 1951 by a martial arts practitioner Minoru Mochizuki when he visited France. Then, he introduced aikido and several aikido techniques to judo students in different areas of France. After this introduction, Tadashi Abe, who cane as the official Aikikai Honbu representative in 1952, remained in France for less than seven years and continued the pursuit.

The following year, Kenji Tomiki conducted a tour along with various martial arts delegates in 15 continental states in the US. And in that same year, Koichi Tohei of Aikikai Honbu was sent by for a year to Hawaii just to set up a number of dojos. After invading the US, Aikido gained patronage in the UK, Germany, and Australia. Today, thousands of dojos are set up for those who would want to learn the practice of the martial art.

BITS AND PIECES OF AIKIDO

If you are interested with aikido but do not have the time and money to go to a dojo and enroll for an aikido class, then you should find other means to do so. One of the easiest ways to introduce yourself into the exciting world of aikido is to browse the Internet and look for aikido video clips.

Being a limitless source of any information, browsing the Internet for various aikido video clips can give you better options and the specific details you would want to learn. Today, there are so many websites that offer aikido clip videos for free for those who would want to learn the basics and for those who would want to get an idea how the martial art works before enrolling to it.

Usually, aikido video clips contain loose form training or popularly known as "ki nagare." Here, the aikido practitioners are just playing around even and after the martial art presentation. The most viewed aikido video clips are those of famous aikido practitioners while conducting their classes or during their practice. But since these are just clips, it is not possible for you to learn everything about the techniques of the martial art.

Amateurs who document the practitioner's lessons and stunts during practice usually take these aikido video clips. Since these are taken in impromptu, you cannot expect high quality resolution and sound. The most common problem would be is that the aikido video clip has a noisy background due to the noises created by people from neighboring gym hall or from the enthusiastic audience inside the dojo.

After filming, they upload these files into the Internet so others can see it. Although these are just short clips, there is a possibility that you pick up aikido techniques that you can practice. Unlike in full-length aikido videos, the variety of aikido techniques is limited when you watch an aikido video clip.

Aikido video clips are available in various aikido sites or from yahoo, google, and u-tube. There are many more websites that offer free aikido video clips but expect that limited amount of information can be gathered.
http://www.articlesbase.com/martial-arts-articles/why-you-should-watch-aikido-video-clips-199516.html

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Street Fighting - Timing Between Techniques

Street Fight Advice

This is not a sparring session. This is the real deal ... a real street attack. Now, what?

In a street fight, assuming that you can’t get away, you are either going to have to deal with a hit or kick or you are going to have to be the one to make the first move.

Even if you are being attacked, you can still be the first one to strike.

Note: Often the courts will rule against you, if you are the first to hit. In their eyes, that’s not self defense. Even if you feel you were forced to strike out, in order to protect yourself. Be aware of the law.

So, at some point, you are going to have to hit. Even if you kick first, then chances are that you will eventually hit, as well. If your attacker hits first, then you are really going to have to hit.

Either you will respond to your attacker’s hit with a block and then a hit, a kick and then a hit, or a hit -- eliminating any extra blocking motion that would precede the punch.

Did you know that once you are in punching range, you will probably continue the fight from that range, or move even closer.

If you’d like to get a martial advantage, then you need to get the upper hand. You have to punch and kick openings. And you have to punch when your opponent isn’t ready for it.

How to Get the Upper Hand Between Moves

I want you to imagine that you are punching an attacker in a street fight. As discussed above, at some point you are going to punch your enemy.

So, you punch (in your mind, for now).

Now, as you punch, I want you to imagine stepping in close as the follow up. I want you close enough to elbow strike your opponent. (Imagine the garlic on your opponent’s breath. Yes, that close.)

In order to get the advantage, you need to shorten the time between that first punch and the elbow strike.

Since street fights progress to close combat range. I want you to get to that range first. Surprise your attacker with the elbow strike.

How do you shorten the space between the two strikes?

Don’t retract your first punch. Morph directly into the elbow shot.

Don’t cock back your elbow in preparation for a strong elbow jab. You don’t need any retraction, first. You can generate a ton of power and save a lot of time going straight forward to your target.

If you can eliminate enough time between the two strikes, then you will be at least a half a beat ahead of your opponent. In a street fight, this can be very important.

So far, this has all been in your mind ... words on a computer screen. How are you going to practice, to make this a real skill?

By the way, how’s your elbow strike?

If you are looking to make your elbow strike faster and stronger, AND you want a great response for when someone tries to get the advantage over you with an elbow strike ... then check out my Free ebooklet on Developing an Elbow Strike Counter. This is a guaranteed skill builder.

This Free ebooklet will give you tips for improving your in-close elbow strike, and a great way to counter almost any elbow strike attempted on you.

The Perfect Free ebooklet for street fighting. Click Here!

Keith Pascal has been a full-time martial-arts writer for eight years and a martial-arts teacher for 25 years.

Street Fighting - When Your Attacker Is Drunk

Would you like an unorthodox tactic for dealing with someone drunk in a street fight?

This one concept could mean that you either won’t have to fight the drunk individual, or you’ll have a definite upper hand, if you do have to fight.

I want to ask you a personal question?

Have you ever been drunk? (No, need to verbally respond to your computer screen.)

Think about all of the symptoms (or characteristics) of being drunk:

* Loss of balance

* The spins (feelings of vertigo)

* Loss of speed in walking and running

* Movement causing nausea

* Loss of stamina

* Blurred vision

* Slurred speech

Can you think of any more?

Unorthodox Street Fighting Tactics
Rather than explain specific martial-arts moves, I’d like to give you a more useful set of tactics.

If you have to face someone being aggressive, who is ‘royally snockered’ on alcohol, then use his (or her) condition to your advantage.

Let’s choose one of the above symptoms ... how about movement making a drunk person sick.

You have to face the drunk street fighter in front of you. So, your tactic could be to be unstable. Rock from one foot to the other.

Take little steps from side to side.

Maybe walk around or circle your opponent, while staying just out of reach.

Imagine how sick your drunkard would get trying to follow you ... around and around ... and aroun -- d....

Are there any other symptoms on the list that you could use against your wanna-be assailant?

Of course, this unorthodox tactic of using your drunks condition against him isn’t guaranteed to work. It “is” designed to give you the advantage. Maybe the ability to get away.

And if your attacker comes in close, you will have the martial skills and the advantage of a clear head, should you have to strike out.

Are you wondering about an effective move to use against a drunk? No, wrist locks and joint locks may not work on someone with dulled senses.

You may have to hit or kick.

I have a little ebooklet that will teach you a couple of important fighting skills. It’s free.

When you get to the part about the three nerve areas to cause pain, I want you to remember that those points may not be as effective on someone who is drunk.

No problem. Just adjust your follow-up hit to a new target, but maintain the same upper arm pressure.

You’ll see what I mean, when you take a look.

This Free ebooklet really will give you tips for improving your in-close elbow strike, and a great way to counter almost any elbow strike attempted on you.

The Perfect Free ebooklet for street fighting. Click Here!

Keith Pascal has been a full-time martial-arts writer for eight years and a martial-arts teacher for 25 years.

Street Fighting - One Way To Make Sparring More Realistic

There has always been a big debate in martial arts:

Does sparring in the dojo (martial arts studio) prepare you for real street fighting?

Many feel that the answer is that it doesn’t prepare you, if you practice “classical” sparring.

(Which is weird if you think about it. It doesn’t prepare you for real street fighting, yet so many continue sparring, claiming they are practicing self defense. Hmmm.)

What I mean by classical sparring is that you face off against one opponent. (Only one opponent? We should be so lucky in a street fight.)

Either you advance on your opponent, or your opponent advances on you. One tries a move, the other responds with a pat against the incoming limb. All nice and clean.

Yawn. Boring -- and not very practical.

Both opponents stay at a relatively safe distance.

Sparring Variation

A variation that is a little better -- notice, I said “a little” -- is when one opponent attacks, and then there is an exchange of two or three moves before each party goes back to his or her comfort zone -- the safe distance.

Well, at least in the variation, there is some contact. You have to respond to an attack.

Still, it’s not preparing you for real street fighting.

Street Fight Preparedness

In a real street fight, when have you known any fighter to maintain a safe distance. Once contact is made, it becomes an in-fight. And it stays that way.

And so, one technique for making your sparring more realistic is to stay in close, once you make contact. Don’t retreat to a safe kicking distance, once you have moved into punching range.

And learn to fight in close.

Practice short vertical punches. Kick low. Develop fast and powerful elbow strikes.

If you're looking to develop a fast and powerful elbow strike for your street fighting, and a good counter or two, read my Free ebooklet on Developing an Elbow Strike Counter.

This Free ebooklet will give you tips for improving your in-close elbow strike, and a great way to counter almost any elbow strike attempted on you.

The Perfect Free ebooklet for street fighting. Click Here!

Keith Pascal has been a full-time martial-arts writer for eight years and a martial-arts teacher for 25 years.

Ray Mercer vs. Kimbo Slice - Both Fighters Make Their MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) Debut

By now, most sports fans are very familiar with the UFC and the sport of Mixed Martial Arts. In fact, the sport is rapidly growing to be more popular than boxing. The UFC Ultimate Fighting Championship) has become a household name in many countries around the world. The Cage Fury Fighting Championship is not as well known as the UFC, but they are doing a good job of drawing attention to themselves, because hardcore MMA fans across the globe are anxiously awaiting this weekends show, and the main even in particular. A topic that is often debated is whether or not a world-class boxer would be able to compete successfully in Mixed Martial Arts. Perhaps on Saturday, June 23rd 2007, we'll know at least how former world heavyweight boxing champion Ray Mercer performs in his MMA debut against an internet legend and brawler by the name of Kimbo Slice.

Ray Mercer has a very impressive boxing record, which includes a WBO World Heavyweight Championship, as well as an Olympic gold medal. During his boxing career, Ray Mercer has fought some of the best heavyweights of our generation, such as Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Larry Holmes, and Wladimir Klitschko. Since retiring from professional boxing, "Merciless" Ray Mercer has decided he wants to try Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), the fastest growing sport in the world.

Mercer’s opponent will be another big name making his professional MMA debut. Kimbo Slice is a big, scary looking heavyweight who developed a cult following on the internet due to his famous bare knuckle brawl videos that are posted on various internet sites. Kimbo has appeared very impressive in these fights, but I'm not sure about the quality of his opponents. Nonetheless, Kimbo's power seems unquestionable. Also, in 2003, Kimbo Slice squared off against Sean Gannon, a MMA practicioner who later fought (and lost) in the UFC. Sean Gannon won his fight against Kimbo, leaving Kimbo laying on the ground unable to continue. However, most of Kimbo's opponents were not as skilled. If you watch his videos online, you will see overweight and untrained fighters that use names such as "Afro Puff" or "Big Mac" and inevitably they get punched out by Kimbo.

Both Ray Mercer and Kimbo Slice are primarily stand-up fighters, preferring to slug it out with their fists. Most MMA fans don't believe either of the fighters have any ground skills, but Kimbo has been seen working on his grappling with Bas Rutten, a MMA legend. Ideally, fans would like to see a slugfest, but I won't be surprised if Kimbo tries to take this fight to the ground, considering Ray Mercer is a former boxing world champion with fierce punching power.

Age could also be a determining factor in this match. Kimbo is 31 years old, and Ray Mercer is 46, but that extra experience could be in Mercer's favor. I definitely give the advantage to Ray Mercer if this turns out to be a stand-up battle. Ray Mercer hits like a truck and is known to have an iron chin. Kimbo should try to take this fight to the mat as quickly as he can, unless he just feels confident that he can take Mercer's punches. Also, Kimbo should not make the mistake of underestimating Ray Mercer on the ground, as he has supposedly been training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu and also has some background in wrestling.

My heart wants Ray Mercer to win this fight, but if you're going to guess who will win you have to consider which fighter has more desire to win. Kimbo is young, and may still feel like he has something to prove, whereas Ray Mercer has been champion and already established himself in the fight sports world. In 2005 Ray Mercer fought a kickboxing match in K1 against Remy Bonjasky, and quit after being kicked upside the head. I may be wrong, but I'm still going to say Mercer wins this. Regardless of the outcome, I just hope it lives up to the hype and is a legitimate, outstanding fight.

Discuss this fight on the new free MMA Forums at www.mma-extreme.com/forum and visit the front page for random thoughts on the UFC and Mixed Martial Arts world at MMA-Extreme.com

Wednesday, November 7, 2007

Choosing the Best Martial Arts Style

For anyone who wants to learn a martial art, there is a lot to know in regards to the many different styles. Of course there is the question of finding the best martial art, which is a question a lot of people ask with so many martial arts styles to choose from, it can be very complicated to pick one to learn.

No matter what you may hear or what others have to say, it is quite impossible to name one style of martial arts as the ultimate best. Actually, there are several factors that come into play,Even though one style may beat another in a competition or a fight it doesn’t always mean that the winning style is the best.

Before deciding to rush out there and learn a martial art, there are several things that you should decide first. Martial arts are great to learn, no matter which style you decide on. A martial art can teach you self discipline, self defence, and several other traits that will help you no matter where you decide to go in life.

Self defence
All over the world, there are several martial arts schools and dojo’s that emphasize self defence a lot more than others. Schools that focus on kata, forms, or light sparring are less than likely to teach you what you need to protect yourself on the street. If you are looking for street self defence, then you’ll want a style that trains hard and doesn’t let up.

Fitness
Even though martial arts can improve your fitness level, it isn’t the goal behind a lot of the martial arts styles. Several styles, such as Tae Bo, are based purely on martial arts and don’t include a lot of physical fitness training. If you are looking for fitness as your main goal, then you should be looking into something other than martial arts.

Fighting ability
This will vary among the many different martial arts styles. Self defence schools will most often take advantage of fighting skills, teaching you everything you need to survive. Most martial arts styles are slow in theory, teaching you kata, movements, and forms. Self defence schools on the other hand, teach you how to inflict the most amounts of damage in the least amount of time.

Competition
Competition based martial arts are all about winning trophies and showing the world your style of martial arts. The competition that you have chosen, will greatly impact your style of martial arts. You’ll need to decide if you will be fighting or showcasing display kata, light or heavy contact, or focusing on grappling or striking.

Before you decide on a martial arts style, you should always research the schools and dojo’s in your area and see what they offer. The best schools will allow you to participate in a few free classes, or offer you discounts on your first few months. They will answer any questions that you have, and work with you to help you learn as much as you can.

Martial arts can be a very fun and exciting learning experience. There are hundreds of different martial arts styles out there, although you may be limited in choice, depending on what all is offered in your area. Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Kickboxing, and Jiu-Jitsu and some of the most common types of martial arts, and normally offered just about everywhere. The more distinct styles, such as Kung Fu, Shoot fighting, Kenpo, and Shaolin styles are a bit harder to find.

If you do your homework on some of the styles that are offered in your area, you’ll find one that best fits your reasons to study. Martial arts can change your outlook on life - all you have to do is devote yourself to learning all you can about the philosophy of your martial art.

You can find out more information on martial arts styles and which one that might be right for you at www.martialarts-technique.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Eddie_Maclean

Saturday, October 13, 2007

Who is the Best Welterweight Fighter in the Ufc

While the UFC has certainly upped it's talent pool with the addition of many fighters from the Pride Fighting Championships, the UFC welterweight division has always been deep in talent.

In fact, our top two fighters each hold wins over each other and our #3 fighter holds the title. Hold on for a bumpy ride as I try to justify my top five UFC welterweight rankings.

5. Jon Fitch is #5 on my top UFC welterweight list. While the UFC marketing machine has been busy promoting Diego Sanchez and Josh Koscheck, Jon Fitch has been slowly building what is the best record in the welterweight division. In fact, Fitch has not been defeated since 2002. He's beaten Luigi Fioravanti, Thiago Alves, Josh Burkman, Jeff Joslin and Shonie Carter on route to his current thirteen fight winner streak. Unfortunately Fitch has yet to fight any of the fighters in our top 4, something that will be corrected at UFC 76 when he meets our #4 fighter, Diego Sanchez.

4. Diego Sanchez has a near perfect mixed martial arts record. He's gone 20 wins with only one defeat. That defeat came at the hands of Josh Koscheck at UFC 69. Diego was going through some health problems at the time, it turned out to be a staph infection in his leg, and probably didn't fight up to his potential. Wins over Nick Diaz, Karo Parisyan, Joe Riggs and Kenny Florian put Diego up near the big boys in the 170lb weight class.

3. Matt Serra is the current UFC welterweight kingpin. He earned his crown by defeating Georges St Pierre at UFC 69. He not only defeated Georges St Pierre, but humiliated him with a first round knockout. This is the first time that Serra has shown really aggressive, effective striking in the Octagon; I hope it continues. One thing Serra has shown is brilliant Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. He's used those skills in wins over Chris Lytle, Yves Edwards and near decision losses to "The Prodigy", BJ Penn and Din Thomas.

2. Matt Hughes is the former UFC welterweight champion. He lost his belt to Georges St Pierre, but not before he had a chance to build up wins over Goerges St Piere, Sean Sherk, Frank Trigg, BJ Penn, Carlos Newton and another MMA legend you may have heard of, Royce Gracie.

1. Georges St Pierre has lost to both the #2 and #3 ranked fighters on this list, so how can I justify ranking Georges #1? Call it gut feeling, call it favoritism, I don't know but what I do know is that Georges St Pierre is the best welterweight fighter in the UFC. Georges does not only have wins over Frank Trigg and Sean Sherk, but dominant, one sided wins. While Matt Hughes struggled with these guys early, Georges just steam rolled them. The same can be said of his second fight with Hughes where St Pierre's striking and take down defense made it a one sided match up. St Pierre has also defeated BJ Penn, in a close decision, Karo Parisyan and most recently Georges surprised the MMA community by out wrestling Josh Koscheck on way to a decisive victory. Georges is back on track and ready to face the winner of Hughes vs Serra.

Matt Hughes and Matt Serra will fight following the conclusion of the Ultimate Fighter "Team Hughes vs Team Serra" reality show. I believe that Georges St Pierre will face the winner of that fight. The truth is, with a talent pool as deep as the UFC welterweight division any one of the top 6 or 7 fighters in the division (add in Karo and Josh) could beat any other one on any given night. That makes every fight in this division exciting!
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-articles/who-is-the-best-welterweight-fighter-in-the-ufc-213645.html

Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Mixed Martial Arts vs Jeet Kune Do - Is This Even a Legitimate Question

In 1993, the Ultimate Fighting Championship was unveiled to the world, and along with the UFC, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (specifically, Gracie Jiu-Jitsu). In the first UFC, along with a host of subsequent others that would soon follow, one was privy to watch the seasoned jiu-jitsu stylist, Royce Gracie, beat all comers. And he beat them easily to boot. No matter the martial artist’s size or style, they all went down.

Many in the martial arts community were shocked and their universe seemingly crumbled about them as the striker was continually felled by the grappler. Many threw in the towel and stopped training in the striking-oriented arts (e.g., Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Boxing) altogether and took up grappling as their martial art of choice. Obviously, grappling was a much better—a more effective—system than the other systems. A grappling craze soon ensued and took the world by storm.

Fast forward to 2007. The UFC is still going strong alongside a number of other mixed martial arts (MMA) venues. And yes, grappling is still a mainstay. However, today, we are witnessing the reverse of what we were watching back in 1993 and to follow. Today, we are seeing the emergence of better strikers and thus more striking in such tournaments and less dependence, for the most part, on grappling. Why this reversal?

The analysis of this particular situation is rather simple. For one, most striking arts, traditionally at least, focused entirely upon striking and ignored the other ranges of combat, i.e., trapping and grappling. The grapplers, early on, were able to capitalize on this weakness in the striking game and thus win match after match, at least for a good while.

After a short time, everyone was on the grappling bandwagon and most of the fights became but mere wrestling matches. As the playing game leveled among the fighters as more and more incorporated grappling into their arsenal, striking would again reemerge as something more was needed to “get an edge” over the competition. The result—more well rounded fighters fighting in such venues and thus the emergence of the phenomenon referred to as mixed martial arts.

Some interesting changes took place in the MMA community due to this. The initial UFCs for example were, effectively, no holds barred tournaments with no weight divisions or time limits. As fighters became increasingly more skilled at both the stand-up and ground games weight divisions had to be implemented along with a timed round scheme.

Today, thanks to the UFC primarily and other like fight venues (Pride Fighting, IFL, etc.) one can train in the “new” martial art, MMA, as schools are springing up all over the world, especially in the US, most taught by actual MMA sport fighters.

What is MMA anyway? Well, at base, MMA is a combination of kickboxing and grappling, though this varies from one proponent to the next. Some emphasize the kickboxing aspect of the art and others the grappling. The kickboxing can be either eastern or western or both and the grappling a mixture of jiu-jitsu and wrestling most typically. In either case, the combination provides for some very well rounded sport fighters.

In the minds of many, MMA is itself considered the ultimate martial art. This is, no doubt, in large part due to the effectiveness of MMA and to the many successes of its proponents in both the octagon and ring. It is indeed effective and this can’t be called into question. But, does this effectiveness in the ring translate into effectiveness in the street? More pertinently, is MMA an art for the average individual concerned with self-defense as opposed to prize fighting?
These questions will be considered more fully in the next installment…stay tuned!


M. Shane Huey is a Jeet Kune Do practitioner and freelance author. He makes his home in South Florida where he lives with his wife Kelli. To learn more about the art of Jeet Kune Do, please visit Sifu Lamar M. Davis II's Hard Core JKD.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=M._Shane_Huey

Monday, September 10, 2007

The 7 Keys to Martial Arts Speed

Regardless of your martial arts style or method...you cannot apply it unless you can react quickly and respond instantly. Speed is critical for success in competition and self-defense. Razor-sharp reflexes are often the sole difference between winning and losing a physical confrontation.
By accessing the seven keys to martial arts speed, you can maximize the benefits of your training and improve your skills for competition and self-defense. The absolute best vehicle for accessing the seven keys to martial arts speed is the Speed Loop™ training system.
The Speed Loop is comprised of the seven components of speed and their relationship to each other when applied in competition or self-defense. The Speed Loop training system is designed to isolate, transform, maximize, and integrate the seven attributes of martial arts speed, including:
1. Visual Reflexes: This component focuses on the training methods that will increase your ability to spot openings and track movements. Exceptional visual reflexes allow you to recognize, track, distinguish, adapt to, and counter movements with precision and confidence. In the martial arts, visual reflexes are primarily utilized during long range fighting. In addition, visual reflexes are critical to the success of world-class athletes in all competitive sports.
2. Tactile Reflexes: This component focuses on the training methods that will develop your tactile (touch) reflexes. With practice, you can learn to instantly feel what the opponent is attempting to do by quickly interpreting the direction of his body force. You must anticipate the opponent's every move when you are in the grappling or trapping range. Ninety-five percent of all fights end up in close range. Be prepared!
3. Auditory Reflexes: You can improve your auditory reflexes by enhancing your listening skills. It is important to react quickly to what you hear. In a situation where you must defend yourself against multiple attackers, you will more than likely hear the attack before you see it. If you have ever experienced blind sparring, or fighting in the dark, you know the importance of this attribute.
4. Adaptation Speed: This component deals with your mind's ability to instantaneously select the perfect action in response to an attack or opening. You should develop the ability to instantly select the most effective movements to use at any point during a physical confrontation. Highly developed adaptation speed will allow your reflexes to carry out the movement selection process automatically. With training, you will learn to respond quickly, accurately, and seemingly without thought.
5. Initiation Speed: You must focus on the development of your explosiveness, once you have chosen the correct action to initiate. It's not how fast you move, but how soon you get there that really counts. Your attack may be very fast in flight, but a slow takeoff will severely reduce your chances of effectively landing that attack on target. Train yourself to make your movements felt before they are seen by developing a flawless poker face and the ability to relax at will.
6. Movement Speed: Movement speed is the ability to quickly transfer part or all of your body from one place to another. It is the speed that is most recognized by the public at large. In addition to genetics and body weight, your ability to contract and relax your muscles efficiently will determine your movement speed. Don’t be concerned with “demonstration” speed. Your training should focus on developing the “applied” speed that will help you overwhelm and subdue an opponent in seconds.
7. Alteration Speed: During your training, be sure to engage in drills that will develop the safeguard known as alteration speed. Alteration speed involves the ability to quickly change directions in the midst of movement. Essentially, it involves control of balance and inertia. Through mastery of body mechanics, you can develop the ability to stop your movement instantly…just in case you initiate a wrong move.
In addition to the seven keys, you should incorporate speed hampering drills into your training for complete speed development. Speed Hampering is the ability to effectively slow down the opponent’s reaction time to your attacks. Having good speed hampering skills will enhance your ability to confuse, immobilize, and defeat an opponent.
By focusing on the maximum development of each individual speed component, your training will be more efficient and effective. This will help you develop superior speed and reflexes in the shortest possible time.
Use the innovative Speed Loop training system to improve the seven keys to martial arts speed and you will see a significant improvement in your total speed and reflexes.
About the Author: J. Barnes has more than 20 years of experience in Mixed Martial Arts. He is the author of “Speed Training for Martial Arts: How to Maximize Speed for Competition and Self-Defense,” which is published by Fitness Lifestyle and is available through Amazon.com, all major book retailers, and all major martial arts suppliers.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=J_Barnes

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Choosing the Best Martial Arts Style

For anyone who wants to learn a martial art, there is a lot to know in regards to the many different styles. Of course there is the question of finding the best martial art, which is a question a lot of people ask with so many martial arts styles to choose from, it can be very complicated to pick one to learn.

No matter what you may hear or what others have to say, it is quite impossible to name one style of martial arts as the ultimate best. Actually, there are several factors that come into play,Even though one style may beat another in a competition or a fight it doesn’t always mean that the winning style is the best.

Before deciding to rush out there and learn a martial art, there are several things that you should decide first. Martial arts are great to learn, no matter which style you decide on. A martial art can teach you self discipline, self defence, and several other traits that will help you no matter where you decide to go in life.

Self defence All over the world, there are several martial arts schools and dojo’s that emphasize self defence a lot more than others. Schools that focus on kata, forms, or light sparring are less than likely to teach you what you need to protect yourself on the street. If you are looking for street self defence, then you’ll want a style that trains hard and doesn’t let up.

Fitness Even though martial arts can improve your fitness level, it isn’t the goal behind a lot of the martial arts styles. Several styles, such as Tae Bo, are based purely on martial arts and don’t include a lot of physical fitness training. If you are looking for fitness as your main goal, then you should be looking into something other than martial arts.

Fighting ability This will vary among the many different martial arts styles. Self defence schools will most often take advantage of fighting skills, teaching you everything you need to survive. Most martial arts styles are slow in theory, teaching you kata, movements, and forms. Self defence schools on the other hand, teach you how to inflict the most amounts of damage in the least amount of time.

Competition Competition based martial arts are all about winning trophies and showing the world your style of martial arts. The competition that you have chosen, will greatly impact your style of martial arts. You’ll need to decide if you will be fighting or showcasing display kata, light or heavy contact, or focusing on grappling or striking.

Before you decide on a martial arts style, you should always research the schools and dojo’s in your area and see what they offer. The best schools will allow you to participate in a few free classes, or offer you discounts on your first few months. They will answer any questions that you have, and work with you to help you learn as much as you can.

Martial arts can be a very fun and exciting learning experience. There are hundreds of different martial arts styles out there, although you may be limited in choice, depending on what all is offered in your area. Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Kickboxing, and Jiu-Jitsu and some of the most common types of martial arts, and normally offered just about everywhere. The more distinct styles, such as Kung Fu, Shoot fighting, Kenpo, and Shaolin styles are a bit harder to find.

If you do your homework on some of the styles that are offered in your area, you’ll find one that best fits your reasons to study. Martial arts can change your outlook on life - all you have to do is devote yourself to learning all you can about the philosophy of your martial art.

You can find out more information on martial arts styles and which one that might be right for you at www.martialarts-technique.com

Monday, August 27, 2007

An Insight Into Muay Thai Kick Boxing

The exact date muay Thai kick boxing was started is hard to narrow down, but it does date back all the way to medieval times. King Nareasen made it famous in 1560 AD when he was given a chance to fight for his freedom. King Nareasan was victorious, freed, and returned home where he declared the fighting style (then called Siamese style boxing) a national sport.

The art of muay thai kick boxing is known as both a hard martial art and as "the deadly art." Muay thai kick boxing is a self defence art developed in Thailand and it enjoys immense popularity in many south-Asian countries as well. There is a wide variety of forms and styles, just like other styles of martial arts.

Muay thai kick boxing is the national sport of only Thailand, though it has become popular in many other countries. The main point that separates muay thai kick boxing from western developed boxing is the fact you are allowed to use shins, knees, elbows and fists. The fighter is able to use 8 parts of his body to strike his opponent.

About 50 years ago, boxing gloves where introduced - before this it was more common to bond smashed shards of glass to a rope binding around the hands. This practice was ended when international muay thai kick boxing tournaments began. This ultimate full-contact martial art, builds stamina and mental toughness. In Thailand, every boy is mandated to learn muay thai and most girls will learn at least some basic moves.

Muay thai kick boxing is designed to be performed unarmed, as every move can be done with combinations of eight body parts. Unlike other forms of martial arts where grappling is done on the floor, the grappling done in muay thai kick boxing is done while standing. The most common techniques used while grappling are attempts to hit the opponent's stomach or head with the knees. Muay thai kick boxing appears as an extremely violent form of martial arts. Contrary to how it appears, it actually provides you with anger control and a constant strive for peace and unity.

To find out more information on muay thai kick boxing as well as other styles of martial arts go to http://www.martialarts-technique.com

Monday, August 20, 2007

The Ultimate Fighting Secret

Last month, I sat down with a group of friends to watch the latest pay-per-view Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) event.

The host of the party was a major fan, and he laid out a nice spread for us with plenty of food and cold beer. The fights started and all seemed to be going well until my host started acting as if he knew something about fighting.

Oh, he knew plenty about the UFC athletes, but not much about an actual street fight.

For him, the be-all-end-all was Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ). He raved about how the Gracie family had invented the sport and how their fighting style dominated anything else out there.

I tried to keep quite, but you can only listen to someone spout the wrong information for so long.

I explained to him that the Gracie's did not invent anything, and that everything they taught they learned from Judo. Sure, they were tough and were a great bunch of athletes (and some of the nicest guys you'd ever meet) but they did not do anything new.

To fully understand BJJ you must first must look at the evolution of jujutsu into the pre-WWII Judo curriculum developed by Jigoro Kano in the late 19th century.

Though supporters of BJJ say Kano considered ground fighting unimportant, they couldn't be more wrong. Kano simply stressed standing techniques because it took ten-times longer to learn then ground work.

In fact, in Japan the saying is "One year to learn ground, ten years to learn standing."

One of Kano's students Mitsuyo Maeda, a veteran Judo instructor who had already taught in a number of countries, seemed like the perfect choice to go to Brazil after World War I.

Maeda showed what Judo could do when he defeated many wrestlers and boxers with pins, armbars, and throws. He even allowed one challenger to use a knife and still quickly defeated the man. These exhibitions made Maeda one of the first mix martial artists. He became very popular in Brazil and impressed Gastao Gracie, a wealthy businessman.

In exchange for financial help, Maeda agreed to train his sons. Maeda only had a few months with the boy so he started with the basics and stressed groundwork rather then the more complex standing techniques.

Helio Gracie loved Judo and continued his training and teaching. While it is unsure why he began calling it Jiu Jitsu, every takedowns, throw, and submission were all things he learned from Maeda.

Helio's only defeat (most matches were draws) was to Japanese Judoka Masahiko Kimura who broke Helio's arm and won the match. To Helio's credit, he didn't tap out, but Kimura completely dominated the match throwing his lesser skilled opponent to the ground at will.

The family continued to teach Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and even brought back "old-school" judo leg-locks and lower body submission. When they brought it to the United States through the UFC, its popularity grew greatly.

While the BJJ guys preyed on wrestlers, boxers, and other martial artists who had never even been choked before, the judo community continued to focus its efforts on the Olympics.

When retired judo Olympic champ Yoshida entered the "Pride Fighting Championships" (Japan's UFC), he handily bested any BJJ practitioner who stepped into the ring. - including UFC champ Royce Gracie.

I can't even imagine the damage he would have done in his prime to today's mediocre mixed martial arts fighters.

Listen, I have no problem admitting that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu works well in a ring, cage, or octagon. While an Olympic caliber judoka would destroy them in competition, BJJ still seems to be a useful skill for today's MMA fighter.

But don't you dare think that BJJ is the answer on the street.

When you hit the deck, there are way too many variables to consider. Including being stomped on, bitten, gouged, or slammed into concrete.

While judo is still technically a sport, at least its training is symbolic of real combat. Throw a man to the ground with force, gain dominant position, THEN finish him off if necessary...otherwise be on your feet and ready for your next opponent.
http://www.articlesbase.com/fitness-articles/the-ultimate-fighting-secret-153973.html

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Chuck Liddell - The Iceman Of Mma, Part 1

e of the most well known names in the world of mixed martial arts is the Ultimate Fighting Championship, more simply referred to as the UFC. The UFC has been a place for many fighters to show their skills and gain fame as professional fighters. One of the more prominent names in the sport of UFC is Chuck Liddell.

Liddell started his martial arts training at age 12. Liddell fights out of San Luis Obispo, California. He is a California born and raised fighter. He went to college at California Polytechnic State University where he wrestled and graduated with a major in accounting. Despite his accounting degree, Liddell worked as a bouncer and bartender before he started his full-time fighting career.

Chuck made his first appearance in the UFC in 1998 fighting in UFC 17. He made his way up the ranks and by 2002, Liddell was the number one contender for the light heavyweight title, which was held by the controversial Tito Ortiz. Liddell and Ortiz had trained together at the Pitfight Club and had a falling out. Ortiz was unwilling to give Liddell a shot at the title, so Liddell was instead scheduled to fight Randy Couture, a veteran of the UFC and former heavyweight champion.

Liddell lost to Couture and Couture later beat Ortiz and became the light heavyweight champion. It was only after Ortiz lost the title that Liddell finally got to fight his bitter rival. In UFC 47, Liddell knocked Ortiz out with a series of brutal punches to claim victory for himself.

In UFC 52, Liddell once faced off against the veteran fighter and light heavyweight champion, Randy Couture. This time, Liddell knocked out Couture and claimed the light heavyweight title. Couture announced his retirement following his loss of the title. Liddell successfully defended the light heavyweight title four more times before he lost the belt to Quinton "Rampage" Jackson in UFC 71. Liddell had held the light heavyweight champion belt for just over two years.
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-articles/chuck-liddell-the-iceman-of-mma-part-1-173016.html

Sunday, August 12, 2007

The Top 3 Mixed Martial Arts Betting Strategies - Don't Bet Again Until You Read This!

Mixed martial arts is a fast growing sport, but the amount of information about betting on mixed martial arts is very scarce. As a professional sports bettor I've learned the ins and outs of mixed martial arts betting in the past 6 months, and I have come up with three betting strategies that are very successful, and will help you profit every year.

Underdog betting
Betting on underdogs has always been a great strategy in sports betting, and in mixed martial arts this strategy is even more successful. In high profile fights, such as large UFC bouts, the underdog is always undervalued and a great bet. Stay away from large favorites, and you'll be in a great spot to profit.

Bet against the public
The majority of sports bettors lose money, so betting against them is always a great idea in sports. In mixed martial arts betting, this also works very well because the sport is so new to the mainstream. Many new bettors are jumping at the chance to bet on fights, and they really have no idea what they're doing. If you want to make some good money with MMA, make sure you are not betting on the same fighters that the general public is as well.

System betting
Betting systems are a crucial part of most professional bettors strategies. Systems are based on certain situations and instances that happen over and over again. Developing a system is very easy in sports such as basketball, which have lots of games every season and you can spot trends pretty easily. In mixed martial arts this is not as easy to do, but systems can be developed. Some guys fight better against certain styles of fighting than others, and you should always pay attention to this when making a system.

Overall, these are my three favorite strategies for betting on mixed martial arts. Implement them into your own betting style and I think it will help you increase your profits in MMA betting.

If you liked this article, be sure to check out my website about how to bet on UFC fights, UFC sportsbooks, and our main MMA betting page

Tuesday, August 7, 2007

When Chops And Blocks Alone Will Not Protect You

By using MMA Training gear, you will find that your body is more protected and better toned to withstand those nasty chops and painful blocks. You need to look into the training devices and accessories that you can get from MMA Training. One piece of equipment is the wooden dummy; with the Dummy you can train without a live person, teach you to hold the proper positions for a better attack. It also helps you to be able to withstand an attack by pre-training your body to withstand the blows. You will also have a better position in your fighting stance.


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You will learn counter attacking, attacking, and to attack with more than just your hand but your hand and say foot. It also trains your footwork, your kicking, shows you how some reactions will get you opposite reactions. You will find your balance improved and your speed even greater.

Now, for those times when your toes go “I have had enough”. There are shoes designed to protect your foot and, specifically, your toes. These shoes are called grappling shoes or better known as sparring shoes. These shoes will keep you from ending up like that guy with the broken bones in his foot, or the other guy with mangled toes, and even a damaged Achilles tendon. The grappling shoes have extra padding around your ankles and on the upper foot.

The shoes have special soles that will not mark up the gym floors or mats, while the reinforced rubber instep will help provide the best traction possible.

Not to forget how cool these shoes look when you are dressed for your next sparring match.

Next I have the MMA Grappling Gloves, which are made to help your hands be the weapons you are training them to be. The hand has dozens of tiny bones in it, each breakable do to the wrong hit, or even the right hit. With the training gloves you protect your hands while still having the flexibility to finish your hits and blocks properly.

The gloves are made of leather and made to protect your hands while making your grip stronger causing the power per hit to be stronger. You will also find that the padding in them helps keep your fingers safe during those training and sparring sessions. The gloves are double stitched for better durability, and the Velcro Wristbands will make them fit you better and protect your wrist.

With just the right amount of equipment such as the ones I have listed above you will find your MMA Training Gear to be the top of the line, causing the best work out you have yet to experience.

Yoshi E Kundagawa is a freelance journalist. He covers the mixed martial arts industry. For a free report on MMA training gear visit his blog.

Yoshi Kundagawa is a freelance journalist covering the martial arts world. Too much time at his computer eating donuts reduced him to couch potato status. He's on a quest to recapture his youth and fitness. You can read his blog at http://www.martialarts3000.com

Wednesday, August 1, 2007

The Importance Of Weight Room Training When Preparing For A Mixed Martial Arts Fight

Contrary to what many believe, the importance of weight room training when preparing for mixed martial arts fights cannot be understated. Over the years, many people mistakenly believe that weight training will cause loss of flexibility and a decrease in speed and this is not so when weight training is tailored to martial arts requirements.Weight room training is a very important part of Mixed martial arts training for a very a number of reasons.

A mixed martial artist needs not only the strength and power for use as attack but must also have the muscle power and stamina to absorb an attack from his opponent. Stretching is very important as it helps create flexibility by increasing your range of motion and the better your range of motion, the more muscle fiber will be stimulated, the more muscle will be produced. This not only increases your strength but also your balance, speed and agility. It also helps provide protection against injury of the tendons, ligaments and connective tissue.

When thinking about weight training, it is vital to remember that there are many forms of weight training and these forms are used to suit the individual and what they are trying to achieve. Sometimes, the word weight training conjures up the picture of a huge muscle bound weight lifter or a massive footballer. These people work at producing large muscles to lift heavy weights for a short time. With mixed martial arts training, the artist wants to increase muscle strength while producing greater speed and stamina.

It should be obvious that if one person has been training and doing squats and bench presses, he is going to be stronger than the guy who only does half the amount of weight training. Nobody is suggesting that you go to the gym and begin to bulk up, far from it. But with a program especially for the mixed martial artist, with your body weight and shape in mind, you will be able to notice a difference in no time. As an example, doing 3 sets of 15 reps of squats, the same with leg curls and leg extensions, add to this walking lunges, standing or seated calf raises, all while using dumbbells (not overly heavy) and including some bench presses should see you building strength fairly quickly.

At this stage, though, as with any new mixed martial arts training regimes, you may notice some soreness as you will be working muscles that have not been worked at this intensity before. Any soreness will decrease as your body adjusts to this new regimen and begins to strengthen. It is wise to consult a trainer at your gym with regards to the exact type of weight training that is right for you. Advise him that you do mixed martial arts and as a precaution, be sure to advise him of any injuries you have had in the past.

Yoshi Kundagawa is a freelance journalist covering
the martial arts world. Too much time at his computer
eating donuts reduced him to couch potato status.
He's on a quest to recapture his youth and fitness.
You can read his blog at http://www.martialarts3000.com

Yoshi E Kundagawa is a freelance journalist. He covers the mixed martial arts industry. For a free report on mma training visit his blog.

Saturday, July 28, 2007

Kickboxing Training Drills To Improve Your Timing In Competitions

Kickboxing is a sport that is somewhat similar to boxing but allows the use of kicks. This simple change creates many more variables and changes the way a fighter must fight. Kicks can be very devastating, but also tend to be slower than punches. Many of the world's best kickboxers can deliver lightning fast kicks, and this is how they become the top fighters in their weight class. Your kickboxing drills should stress speed and timing along with raw power. Even if power must be sacrificed, you should always strive for well-timed kicks that actually land on target. A very strong kick that is blocked wastes your energy, inflicts little damage, and scores no points with the judges. Fast kicks that hit their target do a lot of damage even if there is not much power behind the kick. Also, the judges score based on the number of landed strikes, not how strong you are.


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Your kickboxing drills should have specific targets that you can kick at full speed. The use of a training partner and pads is the best way to improve your accuracy while boosting your speed. When in a match your opponent will have a certain timing to his movements. It is important to learn how to read the timing of an opponent and throw your kicks at the best moments. Using a punching bag does not help you learn to kick at the right moment, but using a human partner does. Your partner should move like he would in a real match and use arm or hand mounted pads to absorb your kicks. These pads serve as targets for you to hit, and your partner will essentially be a dynamic punching bag that actually reacts like a human would.

Your training partner can also feign strikes at you. This helps you learn to time your attacks along with your blocks and dodges. As your training partner throws a punch you can duck it and then respond with a kick or punch. The goal is to land the strike before his punching arm has time to get back to block. Your training partner should then either absorb your strike with his other arm's pad, or wear a full body pad to absorb strikes that come too quickly for him. This kickboxing drill helps you learn how to react to an opponent and his timing rather than just learning your blocking and striking separately. In a real match, striking and blocked are interwoven, not separate. Your eventual goal should be that your partner will have to wear full body pads because his hands cannot keep up with your strikes.
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-articles/kickboxing-training-drills-to-improve-your-timing-in-competitions-167729.html


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An Interview With Ufc Fighter Mike Swick

Mike "Quick" Swick (born 19 June 1979) is an American professional mixed martial arts fighter.

He was a participant in the first season of The Ultimate Fighter, a reality television series produced by the Ultimate Fighting Championship, which is one of the reasons for his popularity. He was eliminated from the competition after a semi-final loss to Stephan Bonnar.

Since joining the ranks of the UFC, Mike has gone 5-0 and is considered on of the top Middleweight contenders in the UFC


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MMAToday: How did you get involved in martial arts and MMA?

MS: I started in Tae-Kwon-Do at the age of 8. I have just been progressing from there every since...

MMAToday: Once you got started did you ever think you make it all the way to the UFC?

MS: I hoped! Ha-ha

MMAToday: How much did your appearance on TUF affect your training and your career?

MS: It made my career what it is today. It was the exposure that I needed and it made me train harder than ever.

MMAToday: What is it like going from fighting in smaller shows to fighting in the UFC? Were you nervous or did you feel you were ready to be there?

MS: It's a big difference. The UFC is the Big Show. I felt ready.

MMAToday: Your first 4 fights in the UFC lasted a combined 6 minutes or so, what was the rush?

MS: I am just an aggressive fighter... ha-ha

MMAToday: How has your training been coming? And how is the hand?

MS: Training is going great! Hand is almost 100%. I am still sparring and doing mitt work, I am just still a little careful with it.

MMAToday: Can you give us a little insight into your training regimen?

MS: We train 2-3 times a day, 6 days a week.

MMAToday: Who are you currently training with?

MS: We have a great crew in now... As far as training, I have Lynn Schutz, Bob Cook, Dave Camarillo, and Javier Mendez. As far as teammates I got Fitch, Koscheck, Thomson, Prangley, Southworth, Fukada, plus a lot of great up and comers. Baroni should be back soon as well.

MMAToday: What motivated you to keep going and fighting?

MS: Wanting to be the best...

MMAToday: Your next opponent is Yushin Okami on March 3rd, anything special planned for that fight?

MS: This fight is not for sure. Nothing is signed. We are still working on it. I want this fight though.

MMAToday: Where do you see yourself in the Middleweight title picture if you are victorious there?

MS: I guess it depends on how I perform. I plan to perform at my best.

MMAToday: How well do you stack up against the current champ Anderson Silva?

MS: Wouldn't mind finding out... ha-ha

MMAToday: Is there any other Middleweight out there in the UFC you would like to fight? And why?

MS: All of them!

MMAToday: Would you still like a rematch with Chris Leben?

MS: That fight will happen eventually and yes I will be happy when it does. After his performance against MacDonald though, it wouldn't be a step up as far as my career goes. I want to fight top contenders right now.

MMAToday: What fights in your career are the most memorable to you?

MS: All my UFC fights have been very memorable.

MMAToday: How much longer do you have on your current contract?

MS: A little over a year...

MMAToday: Any possibilities of jumping ship to another promotion when it's up?

MS: Nope.

MMAToday: Is there any fighter outside the UFC you would like to mix it up with?

MS: Haven't thought about it really.

MMAToday: What fighters do you enjoy watching and why?

MS: GSP, Liddell, Couture, CroCop, Riggs, Loiseau, Silva, etc... All the exciting ones! I am a huge MMA fan myself.

MMAToday: What fighters do you look up to?

MS: Too many to list!

MMAToday: Who do think would be your toughest fight and why?

MS: Right now, I think Anderson Silva. It would be a good test for me.

MMAToday: What are your hobbies outside of MMA?

MS: Traveling. I love traveling! Whatever happens after you die happens, but this is the only earth we will ever have and I want to see it all. I like playing poker as well.

MMAToday: Who do you think the best over looked fighter in your weight class is?

MS: I am not sure. I don't follow the forums too much to know who is favored more and stuff...

MMAToday: What do you think of Randy coming back?

MS: I am excited, I like him a lot.

MMAToday: What do you think of the UFC bringing in fighters from pride etc?

MS: I think they are just getting the best fighters from all over the world from all organizations and I think it's great. I love competition.

MMAToday: If you could fight anyone who would it be? Why?

MS: Silva for the title. I want the belt! Ha-ha

MMAToday: Thank you very much for your time Mike, is there anything you would like to add here to your fans or anyone in general?

MS: Thanks for all your support guys! Please check out my webpage at MikeSwick.com and my Myspace at http://Myspace.com/mikeswick. I am also running a UNICEF campaign to raise money for underprivileged children worldwide. You can check out that page at http://unicefusa.org/ert/mikeswick. Thanks!
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-articles/an-interview-with-ufc-fighter-mike-swick-95145.html

Heavy Bag Training for Mixed Martial Arts, Self Defence and Fitness

Heavy Bag training for Mixed Martial Arts, Self Defence and Fitness.

by S.Ward c/o www.themmaforums.com

The Heavy Bag is most often used suspended from a ceiling but should also be used on the ground to practice ground striking as well. It can be punched, kicked, kneed and elbowed. Used correctly it can improve the power of your striking and gives a great cardio workout as well, but if used improperly can cause injuries.

The Self-Defence benefits of Heavy Bag training

Striking the heavy bag can develop great fight related qualities but is nothing like a real combat situation. The strikes used against the heavy bag are what's known as Gross Motor Skills meaning they are simple actions using large muscle groups and when used under an Adrenal Dump status (the bodies Fight or Flight response) will often result in a greater performance in terms of strength and endurance.


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Training your striking skills can lead to an increased confidence in your ability to strike an opponent which can be beneficial to those whom may be reluctant to fight back or suffer greatly under the bodies adrenal responses.

Good strike training, against the heavy bag, pads and sparring with partner(s) builds competence and confidence and develops 'muscle memory' so when confronted by an assailant gives the ability for the body to strike as it does in training without the person making a concious effort to strike with these developed skills.



AnAerobic Training

Anaerobic training is training at such an intensity that the body is unable to keep up with it's oxygen requirements and so can only be carried out for a short period of time. Carrying out this type of training on the heavy bag both leads to an increased time in being able to carry out a 'flurry' of strikes and also develops the important factor of a 'determination to win'. Driving yourself to carry on with every single ounce of determination, mental stamina and 'grit' you can muster.

Note: This type of training is intense and should not be carried out unless you have a good foundation of conditioning and striking mechanics. Sprained wrists are a common injury sustained in this type of training.



Heavy Bag training for fitness

A good heavy bag training program improves your cardiovascular system, improves muscle strength, bone density, connective tissue strength and also burns calories and fat. By incorporating punching, elbowing, knees and kicks into your traing regime you use all the major muscle groups within the body. Arms, shoulders, abdominals, hip flexors and the leg muscles become both conditioned and also develop coordination.

Stress Management Benefits of Heavy Bag Training

The evolution of mankind has created our brain and bodies to react in a pre-programmed response to danger and is most commonly termed 'Fight or Flight' and causes a host of responses in the body to allow us to either run at a higher speed (flight), or fight at a higher level of intensity (fight). When confronted with danger this is a good thing, but is often mistaken as 'fear'. Today's modern lifestyles often cause the triggering of this pre-programmed response when it isn't needed or wanted, being stuck in a traffic jams, arguments at home can all be triggers for the response.

Also the response causes the body to release toxins which if not used up, cause what is commonly known as 'stress'. Physical exercise is required to flush this 'fight or flight' residue from our bodies before it compromises our health and immune system. Vigorous exercise, such as heavy bag training gives the exertion needed to burn off this residue and return the mind and body to a healthier state.

Take this training, turn up the music and destroy your 'opponent'. Remove all this negative 'energy' from within you and turn it into anger to destroy your imaginary opponent and allow Endorphins to give you that 'feel good' post workout sensation.



Precautions to consider when Heavy Bag Training

Like any form of exercise if taken to extremes, heavy bag training can be counter productive and involve risks. It is designed to 'build you up', increase your strength, your fitness and your health.

Just as impatient weight trainers damage their joints and strain their muscles, or runners who increase their mileage too quickly can suffer shin splints, bag training is exactly the same. Make sure you execute your strikes with proper form to maximise your gains whilst reducing the risks, this will allow you to continue your training for a much longer period of time.

The two types of athletic injuries most common with physical training are 'chronic' and 'acute'. Chronic injuries develop and last over an extended period. Training improperly, too intensely, or too often causes them. When your body is stressed through exercise, it must be given time to recover and rebuild itself in order to become more efficient and be ready to be trained again.

When your training too hard or not resting for sufficient time between your training sessions, you will develop overtraining injuries. It's imperative that you realize that the bodies muscles adapt much faster than the connective tissues and that striking puts a great deal of stress on these connective tissues. Your advances in speed and power will quickly exceed the capacities of your bones, tendons, ligaments and joints. This can result in torn muscles, chronic joint pain and even result in permanent injuries.

Acute injuries like a sprained wrist or a broken bone occur suddenly. The risk of these injuries should be reduced with proper form and of course common sense. Technique comes before speed and power. There isn't a need to smash the heavy bag as hard as you can every time you train. Concentrate on good body mechanics and allow the speed and power to develop by itself. Begin slowly and allow your speed and power to gradually increase and as always allow your body to adapt and become able to handle these stresses.



Avoiding bad practice

Often when people train on the heavy bag their proper technique goes out the window. Feet come off the ground, the body is badly aligned, they wind up their strikes like a baseball pitcher .Don't exaggerate your movements and keep your techniques correct. Apart from the risk of injuries, your practising of these bad techniques will result in incorrect 'muscle memory' and so when you use your techniques against a real opponent, you will leave yourself open to counter attack.

Telegraphing of your techniques

Telegraphing means you make obvious preparations to throw a technique, cocking your fist back before throwing a punch is a good example. As the bag doesn't fight back people often forget the importance of being able to strike your opponent without signalling your intention to do so.



Failing to defend

Because the bag doesn't hit back people drop often their guard when practicing. Keep your hands up at all times and concentrate on not just the attacking part of a technique, that's the easy bit, concentrate of maintaining a good defence as well. Do this with every strike you throw and slowly but surely you will do this automatically over time. Keep moving in and out of range, visualise your opponent doing the same and keep your head moving, don't just move straight back, move side to side, up and down.

Pushing instead of hitting the bag

A common mistake when hitting the bag is to follow through too deeply and push, rather than hit the bag. A punch or kick increases in speed from start of it's movement through until it's fully extended. The further an arm or leg for example moves, the faster and more powerful it will be. Strike the bag at the point near full extension. Penetrate it no more than a few inches beyond the surface and generate a "popping" sound on impact. Never lock out the limbs else you will hyper extend the joint and cause problems in the joint and it's connective tissues.

Holding your breath

People often hold their breath which is a bad habit. First it reduces your endurance by starving your body of the oxygen it needs. Secondly you increase thoracic pressure which can result in you injuring yourself. Exhale as you strike. This prevents the holding of your breath and improves your techniques power by tensing the muscles of your torso which are responsible for a great deal of the power in your strikes.



Always warm up and cool down

Warming up improves your performance and reduces the risk of injuries and post-exercise muscle soreness. Before exercising intensely work up a light sweat and engage in some basic limbering exercises to increase blood flow, your range of motion and to lubricate your joints. Jumping rope, 'running on the spot' and shadow boxing for 10 or 15 minutes are good ways to begin your workout. (Note: don't do extensive stretching during the warm up. It can compromise joint stability and make you more susceptible to injury. Leave vigorous stretching until the end of your workout). steadily cooling down at the end of your workout returns your system (breathing and heart rate etc) to a resting state. Never finish an intense workout and then just stop. The cool down is a time to work on your flexibility with stretching exercises and should be thoroughly enjoyed as flexibility is important, especially in MMA when the ranges and techniques involved range a great deal.



Some ideas for creating a training regime

There are a variety of Martial Arts from which MMA fighters source their striking techniques. The most common one though is Muay Thai but MMA fighters must adapt their footwork as they need to defend from a takedown and wrestling techniques attempts made by their opponent.

Repetition based training: Learn the basic strikes, kicks, knees, elbows and punches and create combinations you want to practice. Perform sets and reps of each. For example, execute two sets of 20 lead punches, three sets of 20 roundhouse kicks, etc. Rest long enough between sets to catch your breath and move on to the next.

Time-based Training: Another excellent way to train is to work for a time limit or set number of rounds. For example, execute either random strikes or pre-determined combinations continuously for 2 to 3 minute rounds with 1-minute rest period in between.

Circuit Training: Circuit training is good if you are already in good shape, consider alternating your bag work with other exercises to form a circuit. However, don't alternate with weight lifting exercises because the muscle fatigue will make you more susceptible to injury. For example alternate 3-5 minutes of jumping rope with 3-5 minutes of bag work. Complete as many cycles as you need to get a good workout.

AnAerobic Training: AnAerobic training should be reserved for those who have established a high level of fitness and proper striking mechanics. This training involves intense barrages of strikes for a time limit (15 to 30 seconds+) or a rep goal (20 to 30 repetitions of a combination). This training is as mental as it is physical as mentioned earlier. There are significant benefits to this "stop/start" or interval-based training. You exert yourself for a brief, intense period, recover, and then exert yourself again. This training improves your ability to recover quickly, increases the efficiency of your muscular and anaerobic energy systems and elevates your metabolism (burning body fat) for several hours post workout.

Frequency and intensity

Heavy bag training, like other forms of exercises, stresses the body. Training too intensely can surpass the body's (joints, tendons, ligaments, muscles, nervous system) ability to recover. I recommend that heavy bag training be limited to 2 or 3 times per week. The more intensely you train, the more time off you should take between workouts. It is a good idea to alternate intense workouts with easier ones.
http://www.articlesbase.com/martial-arts-articles/heavy-bag-training-for-mixed-martial-arts-self-defence-and-fitness-by-sward-co-themmaforumscom-169623.html

 

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